The Redhead Bedhead

The Redhead Bedhead

142,920 notes &

nothing-rhymes-with-grantaire:

perspicious:


WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:    Stay with us and keep calm.The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.
Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.
Move us to a quiet place.We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.
Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.
Speak to us in short, simple sentences.
Be predictable. Avoid surprises.
Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.As odd as it sounds, it works.


                                                                                                                 


WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”2. Say, “Calm down.”This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.”Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.



CREDIT [X]  [X]

This post is important!
One of my girls at camp had a pain-induced panic attack during lunchtime and if it weren’t for posts like this that I see on Tumblr, I might have done something wrong or not known what to do. But because I’d read posts like these, I was able to keep her calm enough that the camp nurse could get her medication to help her and take over when I had to leave to take care of the rest of my cabin.

nothing-rhymes-with-grantaire:

perspicious:

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:
    
  1. Stay with us and keep calm.
    The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.

  2. Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.
    You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.

  3. Move us to a quiet place.
    We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.

  4. Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.
    We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.

  5. Speak to us in short, simple sentences.

  6. Be predictable. Avoid surprises.

  7. Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.
    As odd as it sounds, it works.
                                                                                                                 
WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:

1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”
We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.

Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.

Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”


2. Say, “Calm down.”
This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.

Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.

Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.


3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”
Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.

Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.


4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”
Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.

The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.

Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.


CREDIT [X]  [X]

This post is important!

One of my girls at camp had a pain-induced panic attack during lunchtime and if it weren’t for posts like this that I see on Tumblr, I might have done something wrong or not known what to do. But because I’d read posts like these, I was able to keep her calm enough that the camp nurse could get her medication to help her and take over when I had to leave to take care of the rest of my cabin.

(via hellyeahscarleteen)

143 notes &

There are many negative consequences stemming from the fear of youth sexuality, as well as the fear of female sexuality. One thing that happens is not teaching our girls about sexuality in a realistic way. Sexuality is more often taught to girls as something to be guarded against as sinful (it’s not) or a source of contagion (an unhelpful frame). As a culture we don’t even teach our girls to accept themselves, much less their bodies, and we certainly don’t teach our girls to accept how their bodies might care to be or not be sexual. Instead we need to give our girls a meaningful understanding of how sexuality is something to be accepted on your own terms.
Teaching Consent – Erin Matson (via brutereason)

(via brutereason)

37,826 notes &

aspiringdoctors:

pro-choice-or-no-voice:

To start off Birth Control Appreciation Day, I decided to make an informative masterpost on contraceptives! I hope this helps anyone who may want more information on their birth control or someone trying to decide what kind of birth control is best for themselves! Happy (birth control) hunting! - Paige
DIFFERENT TYPES OF BIRTH CONTROL:
Birth Control Pills - [x] [x]
Mini Pill (Progesterone-only Pill) -  [x]
The Patch (Ortho Evra) - [x] [x]
The Shot (Depo-Provera) - [x] [x]
Birth Control Sponge - [x] [x]
Vaginal Ring (Nuva Ring) - [x] [x]
Spermicide - [x] [x]
Implant (Implanon and Nexplanon) - [x] [x]
IUDs (Mirena, Skyla, and ParaGard) - [x] [x]
Condoms (Male and Female) - [x]
Withdrawal (Pullout Method) - [x] [x]
Diaphragm - [x] [x]
Breastfeeding - [x]
Cervical Cap - [x] [x]
Sterilization (Male and Female) - [x]
Abstinence - [x] [x]
Fertility Awareness-Based Methods (FAMs) - [x] [x]
COMMON QUESTIONS ABOUT BIRTH CONTROL:
Do certain medications make my birth control less effective?
Can I delay or eliminate my period with my birth control?
Will my pregnancy tests come out with an accurate result while I’m on birth control?
Can I use several birth control pills at once in replace of an emergency contraceptive?
Does birth control cause weight gain?
What should I do if I miss a pill?
What should I do if the condom breaks or slips off inside of me?
If I’m on the ring or the patch and I forget to replace it on the right day, do I need to use backup?
I’ve heard that the birth control ring can pop out. What should I do if this happens?
Can birth control increase my risk of getting cancer?
Can you change your mind after having a tubal ligation or vasectomy?
Is it normal to spot or bleed in between periods while on birth control?
Does certain hormonal birth controls affect my blood pressure?
Can being overweight affect my birth control’s effectiveness?
Can certain birth controls lower my libido?
EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTIVES:
Types of EC: Plan B / Ella / ParaGard IUD - [x] [x]
What are emergency contraceptives?
How do they work?
How well does it work?
What are the side effects?
When should I take an emergency contraceptive?
Are emergency contraceptives less effective the heavier you are?
If I am under the age of 18 in the US, can I buy emergency contraceptives without my parent’s knowledge or consent?
If I take an emergency contraceptive today, am I covered if I have unprotected sex tomorrow?
Will taking emergency contraceptives too many times affect my fertility?
To find more questions and answers about emergency contraceptives, you can go here.
Información anticonceptivos de emergencia es disponible en Español, aquí.
OPTIONS FOR PEOPLE WITH ALLERGIES AND/OR CERTAIN PREFERENCES:
Condoms for people with latex allergies.
Condoms for vegans. [x] [x] [x]
Other vegan contraceptive options.
Different types of birth control without estrogen.
Contraceptives without any hormones.
Birth control methods that are useful to people with religious concerns. [x] [x]
OTHER BENEFITS OF TAKING BIRTH CONTROL:
Taking oral contraceptives can help lower the risk of endometrial and ovarian cancer.
Using birth control helps treat acne.
Birth control can help treat the pain caused by Endomitriosis.
Contraceptives offer relief to people with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS).
Anemia can be avoided/treated by using birth control.
Irregular periods can become more regulated by using birth control.
The pill can lead to fewer ectopic pregnancies.
MYTHS ABOUT BIRTH CONTROL (All the myths below are dispelled through the links given):
Emergency contraceptives and birth control pills cause abortions.
Free contraceptives and/or condoms makes people participate in risky sexual behavior.
The pill makes you gain a lot of weight.
Douching after sex prevents pregnancy.
You have to start your birth control on a Sunday.
Taking the pill for a long time can make you infertile.
Hormonal contraceptives protect you from contracting STIs.
You don’t need to be on birth control while breastfeeding.
I won’t get pregnant my first time having sex.
The Pill is effective immediately after you take it.
I won’t get pregnant if I shower or pee after sex.
My body needs a rest from birth control at least once a year.
Emergency contraceptives are affected by alcohol.

This is wonderful!

aspiringdoctors:

pro-choice-or-no-voice:

To start off Birth Control Appreciation Day, I decided to make an informative masterpost on contraceptives! I hope this helps anyone who may want more information on their birth control or someone trying to decide what kind of birth control is best for themselves! Happy (birth control) hunting! - Paige

DIFFERENT TYPES OF BIRTH CONTROL:
  • Birth Control Pills - [x] [x]
  • Mini Pill (Progesterone-only Pill) -  [x]
  • The Patch (Ortho Evra) - [x] [x]
  • The Shot (Depo-Provera) - [x] [x]
  • Birth Control Sponge - [x] [x]
  • Vaginal Ring (Nuva Ring) - [x] [x]
  • Spermicide - [x] [x]
  • Implant (Implanon and Nexplanon) - [x] [x]
  • IUDs (Mirena, Skyla, and ParaGard) - [x] [x]
  • Condoms (Male and Female) - [x]
  • Withdrawal (Pullout Method) - [x] [x]
  • Diaphragm - [x] [x]
  • Breastfeeding - [x]
  • Cervical Cap - [x] [x]
  • Sterilization (Male and Female) - [x]
  • Abstinence - [x] [x]
  • Fertility Awareness-Based Methods (FAMs) - [x] [x]
COMMON QUESTIONS ABOUT BIRTH CONTROL:
EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTIVES:
OPTIONS FOR PEOPLE WITH ALLERGIES AND/OR CERTAIN 
PREFERENCES
:
OTHER BENEFITS OF TAKING BIRTH CONTROL:
MYTHS ABOUT BIRTH CONTROL (All the myths below are dispelled 
through the links given):

This is wonderful!

(via fuckyeahsexualhealth)

Filed under birth control Contraception Emergency contraception

960 notes &

“Crazy” is such a convenient word for men, perpetuating our sense of superiority. Men are logical; women are emotional. Emotion is the antithesis of logic. When women are too emotional, we say they are being irrational. Crazy. Wrong.

Women hear it all the time from men. “You’re overreacting,” we tell them. “Don’t worry about it so much, you’re over-thinking it.” “Don’t be so sensitive.” “Don’t be crazy.” It’s a form of gaslighting — telling women that their feelings are just wrong, that they don’t have the right to feel the way that they do. Minimizing somebody else’s feelings is a way of controlling them. If they no longer trust their own feelings and instincts, they come to rely on someone else to tell them how they’re supposed to feel.

Small wonder that abusers love to use this c-word. It’s a way of delegitimizing a woman’s authority over her own life.
Men really need to stop calling women crazy - The Washington Post (via brutereason)

(via brutereason)

31,718 notes &

uncutting:

ravishingtheroyals:

If you think a blog is “popular” and are afraid to message them because of that, just remember that most likely right that moment that blogger is in sweatpants, eating mac and cheese, and marathoning an entire season of a TV show on Netflix.

Your message would probably be one of the highlights of their day.

This describes me pretty well!

Seriously guys, don’t be shy.

True story.